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Laura Adasko: Pastels > Additional Information
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Blue Mountain Gallery

Laura Adasko
- Additional Information -

Artist's reception: Friday, April 30, 5-8 PM

Laura Adasko paints with pastels. She applies her crayons like  Impressionist brushstrokes. Each stroke becoming an accent of color. The  surface of her paper quivers with vibrant multi-colored marks. At the same  time there is a diffuse lightness. Her motifs evoke landscape but they are  invented, created in the imagination. These are landscapes of the mind,  memories of places seen and forgotten. They relate to one-another in a  lyrical flow. Subtle shifts of color and perspective, of light and shadow,  the addition of trees, hills, a stream suggests a change of season or time  of day, or an altered vista.

We observe the variations unfold in a sequence of 9 recent pastels.  In Yellow Sky, one of the series, fantasy colors create the sensation of  early morning-winter, perhaps. Deep shadows in shades of cool blue stretch  across an open field of pinks. The eye moves to a distant grove of cool  blue trees against a primrose yellow sky. A similar scene is composed in  another work Orange Amid the Green and Violet, but here the colors are  transformed to autumnal hues. The trees have turned a fiery red, the  shadows shifted, and sunlight blazes a yellow-orange path towards clear  skies. Each of the pastels creates its own mood, a unique sensation, yet we  experience the whole as though we have wandered miles of terrain and  seasons of change. The simplicity of the transformation is its beauty.

Laura Adasko lives and works in New York City. She studied art at  the Art Students League, NYC, and Mills College, CA. She has a reputation  as a respected fabric artist. In 1997 Adasko had her first solo show of  pastels at Blue Mountain Gallery, to a sold-out reception. This is her  second solo show at the Gallery.




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