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Ed Ruscha: A Graphic View > Additional Information
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Jack Rutberg Fine Arts

Ed Ruscha
- Additional Information -

Opening on September 22, this exhibition comes to Los Angeles following its run at the National University of Ireland, as this year's critically acclaimed visual arts presentation of the Galway Arts Festival in Ireland.  The exhibition was curated  for the Galway Arts Festival by Jack Rutberg.

Since 1959, original prints have been a formidable part Ruscha's body of work.  Primarily working in lithography, Ruscha has worked in all printmaking media, creating images that comment on the urban vernacular landscape, incorporating letter relationships and wordplay overlaid onto familiar scenes, such as found in his famous "Standard Station" or "Hollywood Sign" prints.  Ultimately, Ruscha's wordplay frequently overtakes his urban scenes as he created works depicting a charged phrase, or just one descriptive word.

Edward Ruscha was born in Omaha in 1937 and was raised in Oklahoma City.  He arrived in Los Angeles in 1959, and soon developed imagery merging the ideas behind Surrealism, Pop Art, and Conceptual Art.

Ed Ruscha: A Graphic View will feature works spanning 30 years.  The exhibition will be shown at Jack Rutberg Fine Arts concurrently with Oskar Fischinger: A Centennial Tribute, an exhibition of paintings and drawings by the pioneering abstract painter and legendary master of abstract animated film.  Both exhibitions are particularly timely.  Fischinger's work is the subject of major symposia and exhibitions at such formidable institutions as the Museum of Modern Art in New York, Los Angeles County Museum of Art and National Gallery.  Ed Ruscha has recently been the subject of  major retrospective exhibitions at the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington D.C., The Walker Arts Center in Minneapolis and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

For more information, please contact Jack Rutberg Fine Arts.




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